Agile: Scoring

Once you have your stories defined and you are ready to “score” them, there are some things you need to keep in mind.

What scale are you going to use for scoring?

I use 1,2,3,5,8,11, and 13. Why? Well, that is just what we used when I started doing Agile, and it seems to work :) Fibonacci + 11. I know I probably should change it so it kind of goes along with the more mainstream numbers that some 3rd party tools and other people recommend. Maybe, someday :)

1 is the lowest, 13 the highest.

At first, the team has no idea what a 1 or 2 or 8 or anything is. It takes time. Over time the team gets a gut feel for what a 1 is, or a 3, or whatever.

Don’t equate points to time! No, a 1 isn’t an hour, or a day, or X. It is a 1.

What are points?

Well, I try to explain it as time, effort, complexity, outside factorness, craziness, etc, etc. You kind of have to bundle all those things up and say, yea, that is a 2. It is more than a 1, less than a 3. Each team is going to have a different meaning for what a 3 is.

During your sprint planning, what you want to do is give everybody a pack of “planning poker” cards so they can score as you go through stories. (There are also web apps for virtual teams, iPhone apps instead of using planning poker cards). As you get done reading the story, and answering any questions, the team should “score” – show their cards. If they are all the same – great! You have a winner.

If some are different, then you discuss or come to an agreement on why some do’ers think it should be higher or lower, and get a score at the end. Example? 6 devs, 4 say it is a 2, 1 says a 3 and 1 says 1, well, most say it is 2, do the other 2 devs agree? if so, you can mark it a 2. If not, you might discuss why. The one dev saying it is a 3 might say, “what about this an that” and then everyone realizes, oh yeah, it is more than 2, and you go with a 3.

What happens if you see 13′s?

What I try to do is say – if you score it a 13, then the story is too big, you should break it up into smaller stories. With that logic, you should never have a 13 on your board.

The biggest thing to remember is that the team is going to have to take a few sprints to get used to the scoring, and understand how stories fit into points. You ARE going to over and under score – it is just reality. But don’t adjust the scores during the sprint. Things just tend to work themselves out over time. What you can do is capture actuals at your retrospective and compare to what the original scores were. The team might get a better idea on what they should be scoring things then. Another thing to try is a scoring guide. After some time, you can say “every story we do that involves making a new button on a form is usually a 2″ so then if you have a story like that, and the team scores it a 8, or they don’t know what to score it, you can look back at your guide and say -hey, we usually score these 2′s, so is a 2 ok?

Who scores?

This is a good question, who should score? My opinion? Just the do’ers. The scrum master shouldn’t score, and product owner/analysts shouldn’t score. Just the do’ers.

What do you do with the points/scores?

You track your daily burndown, and your “velocity” per sprint. More on that later.

Just remember, think of stories as being scored by points. Or bananas. Or stars. Just not hours :)